SELECT A REGION: Counting Reef Check surveys worldwide Zoom to:
Interactive mapping by
GreenInfo Network
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These are the same data as the Distribution Chart and Time graph, but in spreadsheet format.


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Download the Site Distribution Chart as as image file (PNG).


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Download raw data for selected species and sites as a spreadsheet (XLS).


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Nearest MPA:
MPA Region:

Protection status:
County:

Average depth: meters

Most recent survey:

surveys conducted here:

Other websites and documents:

No data for this site.

All species seen here:

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    All species seen here:

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      All species seen here:

        No data for this site.

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        Location:
        Coordinates:
        Distance to shore: m
        Distance from nearest river: km
        Distance to nearest popn center: km

        Transect orientation:

        survey(s) conducted here. Click for details.

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        Coming soon

        This graph displays the density of the five most abundant species (fish, invertebrates, seaweed) for the years that this site was surveyed. Density is the number of individuals of a species in a given area (the only exception to this is Giant Kelp –see below). Estimates of densities are the mean number of organisms per transect at a site. For Reef Check’s California sites, a transect covers an area of 60 square meters. For tropical sites, the area of a transect is 400 square meters. You can deselect species by clicking on them in the legend next to the graph.

        Below the graph is a list of all species that Reef Check ever recorded at this site.

        For California, invertebrate and seaweed data is collected along six transects at every site and fish are counted along 18 transects at every site. Invertebrates and seaweeds are recorded if they are within a 2 meter wide swath on the seafloor along the 30 meter long transect. Fish are counted if they are within a 2 meter wide and 2 meter “tunnel” area along the transect. For Giant Kelp, we record the number of individuals as well as the number of stipes per individuals. The reported density is the number of stipes per 60 square meters rather than the number of plants. We report kelp in this way because the stipe density is a better estimator of giant kelp biomass than the number of plants.

        At tropical sites, fish and invertebrate data is collected along four 5 meter wide by 20 meter long segments of a 100 meter transect line for a total survey area of 400 square meters. Fish seen up to 5 meters above the line are included.

        These data are means from Reef Check surveys. Statistically a mean value always has an estimate of its error associated with it. Errors are not displayed on these graphs for clarity. Without an estimate of the error of the means and the appropriate statistical tests, it cannot be evaluated if differences between sites, years and/or species are statistically significant. Therefore, the way in which these data are presented can help identify trends, but this graph cannot be used to evaluate if these trends are statistically significant.

        The pie chart represents the percentage of substrate types recorded during the Reef Check survey.

        For California surveys, the pie chart represents the percentage of five substrate types recorded during the most recent Reef Check survey at this site. This is the mean percentage from six transects at each site. By moving your mouse over the pie you can display the percentage values.

        Reef Check California records substrate types along 30 equally spaced points on each 30 meter long transect (Uniform Point Contact surveys) and classifies the seafloor substrate in the following categories:

        This graph displays the abundance or density of the species at the sites you selected. Density is the number of individuals of a species in a given area (the only exception to this is Giant Kelp –see below). Estimates of densities are the mean number of organisms per transect at a site. For Reef Check’s California sites, a transect covers an area of 60 square meters. For tropical sites, the area of a transect is 400 square meters.

        Densities are summarized across all years that you selected by using the “Select Years” slider in the left panel. If you wish to display the mean of the data for all the sites you selected click ‘Show Species Summary’’ above the graph. In this case bars represent the mean density for all selected sites for each species. You can unselect species by clicking on them in the legend next to the graph.

        For California, invertebrate and seaweed data is collected along six transects at every site and fish are counted along 18 transects at every site. Invertebrates and seaweeds are recorded if they are within a 2 meter wide swath on the seafloor along the 30 meter long transect. Fish are counted if they are within a 2 meter wide and 2 meter high “tunnel” along the transect. For Giant Kelp we record the number of individuals as well as the number of stipes per individual. The reported density is the number of stipes per 60 square meters rather than the number of plants. We report kelp in this way because the stipe density is a better estimator of giant kelp biomass than the number of plants.

        At tropical sites, fish and invertebrate data is collected along four 5 meter wide by 20 meter long segments of a 100 meter transect line for a total survey area of 400 square meters. Fish seen up to 5 meters above the line are included.

        These data are means from Reef Check surveys. Statistically a mean value always has an estimate of its error associated with it. Errors are not displayed on these graphs for clarity. Without an estimate of the error of the means and the appropriate statistical tests it cannot be evaluated if differences between sites and/or species are statistically significant. Therefore, the way in which these data are presented can help identify trends, but this graph cannot be used to identify statistical differences between species or sites. The raw data that were used to produce this graph can be downloaded on the Export tab. To do any statistical analyses please obtain the raw data that went into this graph.

        This graph displays the density (abundance) of the species for the years and sites that you selected. Density is the number of individuals of a species in a given area (the only exception to this is Giant Kelp –see below). Estimates of densities are the mean number of organisms per transect at a site. For Reef Check’s California sites a transect covers an area of 60 square meters. For tropical sites the area of a transect is 400 square meters.

        Densities are estimated for each year that you selected by using the “Select Years” slider in the left panel and displayed as a line graph. If you wish to display the mean of the data for all the sites you selected click ‘Show Species Summary’’ above the graph. In this case lines represent the mean density for all selected sites for each species. You can unselect species by clicking on them in the legend next to the graph.

        For California, invertebrate and seaweed data is collected along six transects at every site and fish are counted along 18 transects at every site. Invertebrates and seaweeds are recorded if they are within a 2 meter wide swath on the seafloor along the 30 meter long transect. Fish are counted if they are within a 2 meter wide and 2 meter high “tunnel” along the transect. For Giant Kelp we record the number of individuals as well as the number of stipes per individuals. The reported density is the number of stipes per 60 square meters rather than the number of plants. We report kelp in this way because the stipe density is a better estimator of giant kelp biomass than the number of plants.

        At tropical sites, fish and invertebrate data is collected along four 5 meter wide by 20 meter long segments of a 100 meter transect line for a total survey area of 400 square meters. Fish seen up to 5 meters above the line are included.

        These data are means from Reef Check surveys. Statistically a mean value always has an estimate of its error associated with it. Errors are not displayed on these graphs for clarity. Without an estimate of the error of the means and the appropriate statistical tests, it cannot be evaluated if differences between sites, years and/or species are statistically significant. Therefore, the way in which these data are presented can help identify trends, but this graph cannot be used to evaluate if these trends are statistically significant. The raw data that were used to produce this graph can be downloaded on the Export tab. To do any statistical analyses please obtain the raw data that went into this graph.